Critter Corral Opens at Museum

How would the history of San Joaquin County have been different without its farm animals? What about now? For more than 150 years, they've played a vital role in the County's way of life. Despite their historic importance, however, cattle, sheep, horses, and other farm animals tend to get overlooked nowadays by a population—especially children—that often lacks direct contact with agriculture.

Livestock judging demonstration, Lockeford, California, 1922.

Livestock judging demonstration, Lockeford, California, 1922.

This summer, the San Joaquin County Historical Museum is offering residents of all ages in the County an opportunity to reconnect. Every weekend this summer, they can visit and pet a variety of live farm animals at the San Joaquin County Historical Museum. Admission to this new "Critter Corral" will be free to Museum visitors with regular admission, Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., through September 1, 2013.

Regular Museum admission is five dollars for adults (18–64), four dollars for seniors (65+) and teens (13–17), and two dollars for children (6–12). Admission is free for children five years and younger and for members of the San Joaquin County Historical Society. There is a parking fee for each vehicle that enters Micke Grove Regional Park. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, but closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

The San Joaquin County Historical Society operates the Historical Museum in Micke Grove Regional Park. The Society provides education programs for school groups such as "Valley Days" and "Pioneer School Day" (in the 1866 Calaveras School). The Museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.

For additional information see www.SanJoaquinHistory.org.

You must be logged in to post a comment.