Theresa and Charles Wriston: Chapter Two

Who would have ever thought? Last week's post, which involved Charles Wriston, his wife, Theresa, and their two children, triggered a lot of feedback. The responses tended to fall into two categories.

The California Constitution of 1849, written at Colton Hall, Monterey, granted women trailblazing rights.

The first filled in missing biographical details. Thanks to one of . . . → Read More: Theresa and Charles Wriston: Chapter Two

Surprises on the Trail of Dusty Old Records

What comes to your mind when you hear the words historic county records? Darkened warehouses? Moldering paper? Dusty shelves? How about stories of tragedy, courage, and compassion?

Old records filled with surprises.

Since the middle of January, I've had the honor to work with three current or former students from the University of the Pacific taking an . . . → Read More: Surprises on the Trail of Dusty Old Records

Exhibit of Historic Postcards to Open at Museum

One of the most fascinating but little-known treasures of the San Joaquin County Historical Museum may be its collection of historic postcards. The scenes they depict range from the mundane to the bizarre. Starting the first week of March, visitors can catch glimpses into this rich collection of local resources when the Museum opens an exhibit . . . → Read More: Exhibit of Historic Postcards to Open at Museum

A Call for Images of the Calaveras River

Volunteers from Stockton's Friends of the Lower Calaveras River and professionals from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with videographers from NarrativeLab of Portland, Oregon, are working on a video documentary of the removal of barriers along the Calaveras River to fish that migrate between fresh and salt water.

Recent photograph of the Calaveras River.

The . . . → Read More: A Call for Images of the Calaveras River

Trivial Pursuit: The San Joaquin County Edition

One of the Museum's staff members has been working forever on a project that has taken her through every single issue of the San Joaquin Historian, the Society's historic periodical, ever since its creation in 1963. And she's done it several times. Last week, I suggested half-seriously that she knew enough to put together the authoritative . . . → Read More: Trivial Pursuit: The San Joaquin County Edition

Do Museums Make People Smarter?

Can museums make you smarter? A team of researchers based in Arkansas thinks they can. But what about California? Those of us who live in San Joaquin County have some handy tools in our own backyard that can help us answer this question for ourselves.

Having fun getting smarter: Pioneer School at the San Joaquin County . . . → Read More: Do Museums Make People Smarter?

Celebrate Christmas with Festival of Trees

Even Scrooge would get in the holiday spirit gazing at the more than seventy beautifully decorated unique Christmas trees at the San Joaquin County Historical Museum's twenty-second annual Festival of Trees.

Ho, Ho, Ho! Santa with three happy visitors, 2011.

This family event will be held December 7 and 8 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at . . . → Read More: Celebrate Christmas with Festival of Trees

The Long Walk

"Dad, are we almost there?"

Remember how boring it was to ride long distances in the family car when you were a kid? Except for the excitement of violating that invisible boundary in the back seat that separated you and your brother. But that had its downside, too.

Maintenance supervisor Mike Mason discovers how heavy the . . . → Read More: The Long Walk

New Exhibition Explores American Workforce

Every day, folks are hard at work on farms, in factories, hospitals, schools, fire stations, offices, squad cars, and homes, all helping our communities thrive. In tribute to workers, the San Joaquin County Historical Museum will host the California premiere of "The Way We Worked," a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. "The Way We Worked" will be . . . → Read More: New Exhibition Explores American Workforce

Market Hunting in the San Joaquin Valley

Remember Passenger Pigeons? Probably not. The last one died in 1914, a casualty of mass deforestation and overhunting. An estimated three to five billion lived in North America when Europeans arrived, but their numbers plummeted over the next three centuries. Perpetuation of this once–numerous bird apparently wasn't a matter of high priority.

Duck hunter in the . . . → Read More: Market Hunting in the San Joaquin Valley